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Tuesdays with … April 13, 2015

Here’s your Tuesdays with…. update for those in need of a kidney transplant and their advocates. It is a short one this week. You could use the following information and email to family members, friends and post on your Facebook page and other social media outlets. You could also include additional information about your health, progress and other activities. If this is your first Tuesdays with… update, click here to learn how to use Tuesdays with… to expand on your Kidney Kampaign.


Myths about Living Kidney Donation

Ilana Silver Levine, LMSW and Marian Charlton, RN, CCTC put together a list of myths and facts about being a living donor. Here are some key points.

Myth #1: A kidney donor will have to take medications for the rest of their life.

Fact #1: A kidney donor will be given prescriptions for pain medication and stool softeners at discharge from the hospital. These are only for the immediate post-operative period, after that time, a donor does not have to take medication.

Myth #2: A kidney donor will have debilitating pain for an extended period of time.

Fact #2: A kidney donor will have some pain after surgery from both the incisions and related to gas and bloating. This pain will diminish in the days following surgery and can be controlled with pain medication if necessary.

Myth #3: A kidney donor will be on bed rest following surgery.

Fact #3: A kidney donor will be out of bed and walking independently before discharge from the hospital.

Myth #4: A kidney donor will be in the hospital for an extended period of time after surgery.

Fact #4: A kidney donor will be hospitalized for two nights (i.e. if surgery is on a Tuesday, the donor will typically be discharged on Thursday).

Myth #5: A kidney donor can no longer participate in sports or exercise.

Fact #5: A kidney donor should be able to return to regular activities and exercise at approximately 4-6 weeks following surgery.

Myth #6: A kidney donor will have to follow a new diet plan following donation.

Fact #6: A kidney donor should eat a healthy, well balanced diet. There are no dietary restrictions following donation.

Myth #7: A kidney donor can no longer consume alcohol following donation.

Fact #7: While excessive alcohol use is always dangerous, a kidney donor can consume alcohol in moderation.

Myth #8: A female kidney donor should not get pregnant after donation.

Fact #8: A female kidney donor should wait 3-6 months' time after donation to become pregnant. The body requires time to recover from the surgery and to adjust to living with one kidney prior to pregnancy.

I hope this gives you a better sense of the positive impact of becoming a living kidney donor.


Can you suggest another way to let others know about your need? Please share it with us by Clicking Here and we will include in in a future Tuesdays With... update.

If you know someone else in need of a kidney transplant or would like to pass this on to your doctor or a dialysis/transplant social worker please provide him or her with this link:
http://lkdn.org/tuesdays_with

Until next week, we wish you the best in your journey.


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Harvey
Harvey Mysel, Founder & President

Harvey established the LKDN after recognizing the need for better resources while pursuing a successful living kidney transplant in 2006. Our purpose is to share knowledge and build the confidence to enable the life changing benefits of living donation. Click here to learn more about Harvey.

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