Study shows women are less likely to opt to undergo living donor kidney transplantation

Nephrology News & Issues

Study shows women are less likely to opt to undergo living donor kidney transplantation

August 18, 2014

A new study of 116 patients in two predominantly black hemodialysis units demonstrates that women are less likely than men to want to receive kidney transplants from living donors, despite more offers from family and friends. The findings will appear in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN).

Recent research into kidney transplant disparities has focused primarily at the transplant clinic level, but disparities might be underestimated when only patients undergoing transplant evaluations are studied, the researchers said.


Read also: National Kidney Foundation supports legislation protecting living organ donors


For this reason, Avrum Gillespie, MD from Temple University School of Medicine and his colleagues looked for disparities in dialysis clinics and included patients both potentially eligible and ineligible for receiving a transplant.

“Information gained about the concerns and attitudes of hemodialysis patients regarding living donor kidney transplantation might help us develop targeted interventions designed to alleviate some existing disparities,” said Gillespie.

The research team administered a transplant questionnaire to 116 patients in two urban, predominantly black hemodialysis units. Among the major findings:

  • Women were less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation compared with men (58.5% vs 87.5%) despite being nearly twice as likely as men to receive unsolicited offers for kidney transplants from family and friends (73.2% vs 43.2%).
  • Women were also less likely to have been evaluated for a kidney transplant (28.3% vs 52.2%).
  • After controlling for various factors known to influence transplant decisions, women were 87% less likely to want to undergo living donor kidney transplantation than men.

“To help improve the gender disparities in living donor kidney transplantation, future work is needed to learn how to support and encourage women to accept transplants,” said. Gillespie.

Read online by clicking here.

For a printable version, click here.

 

Harvey
Harvey Mysel, Founder & President

Harvey established the LKDN after recognizing the need for better resources while pursuing a successful living kidney transplant in 2006. Our purpose is to share knowledge and build the confidence to enable the life changing benefits of living donation. Click here to learn more about Harvey.

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